New Chinese Cinema

New Chinese Cinema:
The Unofficial Stories of Tang Tang, Fourth Child, Little Moth and Others

Jack H. Skirball Screening Series

Pan-Chinese cinema is coming of age now, with an explosion of genres, formats, themes and talents. Exploring new and exhilarating artistic paths or alternative sexualities, giving voice to a colorful array of people from metropolises to remote provinces, the films featured in this series bear witness to the tremendous changes experienced by Chinese society. They leave no stone unturned: the vagaries of industrialization, eroticism, family relationships, delinquency, the lure of modernity, the travails of resistance…

A note on the series subtitle: each of the names is of a lead character from a film playing in the series. Whether whimsical or plebeian, these nicknames carry no echo of such Chinese symbolism of might, power or officialdom as dragons and tigers. Therefore ours is a series of “Unofficial Stories” of ordinary people living ordinary lives in a time of extraordinary change.

Tsai Ming-liang: The Wayward Cloud (Tian Bian Yi Duo Yun)
Wed Oct 10 | 8 pm

Taiwan, 2005, 112 min., 35mm
Los Angeles premiere

In drought-stricken Taipei, the feverish, sensual and emotional journey of a two-bit porn actor and a young woman toward an unexpected amour fou unfolds against a droll and surreal background designed by Tsai’s visionary wit.

Wu Wenguang: Fuck Cinema
Thu Oct 11 | 8 pm

China, 2006, 170 min., MiniDV
International premiere

Vérité documentarist Wu waited a long time before releasing this pungent, yet moving, indictment of how cinema is affecting -- and sometimes destroying—the lives of ordinary people in China. A must-see!

Preceded by
Jia Zhangke: Ten Years
China, 2007, 8 min., 35mm
Print courtesy of Cyberport and Digital Media Centre

Queer Night!
Fri Oct 12 | 8 pm

Zhang Hanzi: Tang Tang

China, 2004, 92 min., Betacam SP
Los Angeles premiere

An alluring mixture of documentary and fiction about the fabulous nights, grey mornings and cross-gender love affairs of a drag queen—sorry, “reversed role actor”—in Beijing.

Followed by
Cui Zi’en: Withered in a Blooming Season (Shaonian Hua Cao Huang)

China, 2005, 90 min. Betacam SP
U.S. premiere

Cui, godfather of the queer underground, blends melodrama and sassiness to depict a post-socialist dysfunctional family in which love crosses the boundaries of gender and propriety to forge a sweet utopia.

Festival Award Winners Marathon
Sat Oct 13 | 2 pm–midnight

This program features a quartet of award winners—from the Locarno, Tokyo, Vienna and Cannes festivals—focused on questioning gender and family relationships and the place of women in contemporary China.

Sheng Zhimin: Bliss (Fu Sheng)
Sat Oct 13 | 2 pm

Hong Kong/China, 2006, 96 min., 35mm
U.S. premiere

A man receives the ashes of his ex-wife; a young delinquent discovers love; a couple is in a crisis. In Sheng’s sensitive, multilayered drama, produced by Fruit Chan, bliss comes in subtle yet illuminating ways.

Zhang Lu: Grain in Ear (Mang Zhong)
Sat Oct 13 | 4 pm
China/South Korea, 2005, 110 min., 35mm A young Korean-Chinese woman lives with her little boy on the city outskirts, selling kim chi. Long takes and painterly compositions suggest her complex interior life— with a twist that transcends her apparent victimization (with a vengeance!).

Li Yu: Dam Street (Hong Yan)
Sat Oct 13 | 7:45 pm

China, 2005, 93 min., 35mm
Los Angeles premiere

A major female voice in Chinese cinema, Li deciphers the troubled personal life of a young singer in a down-and-out Sichuan opera troupe who was once thrown out of school for getting pregnant in the early ’80s. Print provided by The Global Film Initiative

Ying Liang and Peng Shan: The Other Half (Ling Yiban)
Sat Oct 13 | 9:45 pm

China, 2006, 111 min., DVCAM | Los Angeles premiere

For their second feature, the boyfriend-and girlfriend team of Ying and Peng made giant leaps: frontal composition, fractured narration and a savvy mixture of documentary and fiction show how sexual impasse and industrial catastrophes intersect in a Sichuan town.

New Chinese Cinema: The Unofficial Stories of Tang Tang, Fourth Child, Little Moth and Others is curated by Cheng-Sim Lim, Co-Head of Exhibition & Public Programs, UCLA Film & Television Archive, and Bérénice Reynaud, Co-Curator of Film/Video Programs at REDCAT.

Programs of New Chinese Cinema: The Unofficial Stories of Tang Tang, Fourth Child, Little Moth and Others at the UCLA Film & Television Archive are held at the Billy Wilder Theater.

Associated Images: 

Programs subject to change. Please contact the UCLA Film & Television Archive (www.cinema.ucla.edu; 310 206-8013) for updated information.

Date/Time G ST CA

Wed 10.10.07 8:00 pm

Thu 10.11.07 8:00 pm

Fri 10.12.07 8:00 pm

Sat 10.13.07 2:00 pm

Sat 10.13.07 4:00 pm

Sat 10.13.07 7:45 pm

Sat 10.13.07 9:45 pm

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G - General Audience

M - REDCAT Members

ST - Students

CA - CalArts Students/Faculty/Staff